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Reeding
A decorative motif of parallel convex moldings that is similar to fluting, which has concave parallel moldings. See also "Fluting".
Regence
Period of architecture and design between Louis XIV and the Rococo and named for the time in France from 1715-1728 when Philip, Duke of Orleans, reigned. Characteristics include the cabriole leg and ornamentation based in observation of nature rather than in classical mythology. Asymmetrical arms with lifelike castings of foliage adorn chandeliers and candelabra arms.
Regency
Period of strict Neoclassicism between 1810-1820 and influenced by the French Empire, especially Napoleon’s expeditions to Egypt. The term English Regency in the decorative arts is taken broadly to mean late 18th– to early 19th-century Neoclassicism.
Renaissance
The Renaissance was a revival of interest in Greek and Roman classical design that began in Italy during the 14th century and spread to France, Germany, and England up to the 17th century. Early designs are planar and simple and emphasized the use of classical devices such as round arches, rustication, pediments, paterae, acanthus, swags, and cornucopia.
Repousse
Ornamental relief work on sheet metal where the design is pushed out by hammering from the reverse side in a technique similar to embossing and used extensively in Spanish art.
Ring
A ring is a circular metal or wood frame of any profile used to hold an array of candelabra arms or the lens of an inverted dome chandelier. Also referred to as a "rim".
Ring Chandelier
A chandelier whose defining characteristic is a circular or oval metal or wood band to which candles, lanterns, or shades attach. Also called a "hoop chandelier" or a "wagon wheel chandelier".
Rock Crystal
Clear colorless quartz or amethyst that is cut and polished for use in dressing the frames of chandeliers and candelabra. Real crystal can only be cut or carved and cannot be blown or otherwise hot worked.
Rococo
A late Baroque period in architecture and design originating in the 18th century. It followed asymmetrical lines and close observation of naturalistic details and often included seashell and “C” scroll motifs.
Rosette
A rosette is an ornament, often circular, that represents a stylized flower. A rosette can be non-separable part of a larger design or it can be detachable. Rosettes commonly have a threaded back end and are used to attach a sconce to the wall. On an inverted dome chandelier, they are seen on the top outside lip of the lens for both decorative effect as well as functional support. A threaded post would connect through the lens to a loop and the suspension chains/rods.
Rough-in
The process of wiring a building and installing the back boxes of electrical devices before the finish work is started.